AAUW-DAW INTERNATIONAL GOURMET ITALIAN DINNER

 By Jarilyn and Marco Jennison

Remember to bring your own drinks. Coffee and water will be served. Please RSVP Judy Lauper, jalauper@gmail.com, with your choice for preparation. Remember first call/email getts first choice. You will be contacted the week of the dinner with the number of servings to prepare. Menu below:

MELON WITH PROSCIUTTO: Fari Falaki
MOZZARELLA SKEWERS: Fari Falaki
MINESTRONE:Margie Singler
PASTA WITH THREE CHEESES:Holly Sauer
NORTHERN ITALIAN CHICKEN CACCIATORE:Judy Halden, Roseann Krane
PEPPERS, ROMAN STYLE:Judy Lauper
MIXED GREEN SALAD:Roberta Carter Smith
ORANGE SHERRY CREAM:Joan Reynolds
ESPRESSO COFFEE: Jarilyn Jennison

WINE Italian cuisine has developed through centuries of social and political changes, with roots as far back as the 4th century BCE. Italian cuisine in itself takes heavy influences, including Etruscan, ancient Greek, ancient Roman, Byzantine, and Jewish. Significant changes occurred with the discovery of the New World with the introduction of items such as potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers and maize, now central to the cuisine but not introduced in quantity until the 18th century. Italian cuisine is noted for its regional diversity, abundance of difference in taste, and is known to be one of the most popular in the world, with influences abroad.

Italian cuisine is characterized by its extreme simplicity, with many dishes having only four to eight ingredients. Italian cooks rely chiefly on the quality of the ingredients rather than on elaborate preparation. Ingredients and dishes vary by region. Many dishes that were once regional, however, have proliferated with variations throughout the country.

Cheese and wine are a major part of the cuisine, with many variations and Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) (regulated appellation) laws. Coffee, specifically espresso, has become important in Italian cuisine.

Meal structure
Main article: Meal structure in Italy
Traditionally, meals in Italy usually contain 3 or 4 courses. Meals are seen as a time to spend with family and friends instead of immediate sustenance; thus, daily meals can be longer than in other cultures. During holidays, family feasts can last for hours.

Today, the traditional Italian menu is kept mainly for special events (such as weddings) while an everyday menu includes only the first and second course, the side dish and coffee. A notable aspect of Italian meals is that the primo or first course, is usually a more filling dish such as risotto or pasta. Italian cuisine also includes single courses (all-in-one courses), providing carbohydrates and proteins at the same time (e.g. pasta and legumes).

A bottle of sparkling Prosecco, which one would have as an aperitivo.


Meal stage

Composition

Aperitivo

apéritif usually enjoyed as an appetizer before a large meal, may be: Campari, Cinzano, Prosecco, Aperol, Spritz, Vermouth.

Antipasto

literally "before (the) meal", hot or cold appetizers

Primo

"first course", usually consists of a hot dish like pasta, risotto, gnocchi, or soup.

Secondo

"second course", the main dish, usually fish or meat. Traditionally veal, pork and chicken are most commonly used, at least in the North, though beef has become more popular since World War II and wild game is found, particularly in Tuscany. Fish are generally caught locally.

Contorno

"side dish", may be a salad or cooked vegetables. A traditional menu features salad along with the main course.

Formaggio e frutta

"cheese and fruits", the first dessert. Local cheeses may be part of the Antipasto or Contorno as well.

Dolce

"sweet", such as cakes (like Tiramisu) and cookies

Caffè

coffee

Digestivo

"digestives", liquors/liqueurs (grappa, amaro, limoncello, sambuca, nocino, sometimes referred to as ammazzacaffè, "coffee killer")

Note: On restaurant menus, these terms may be referred to as Primi, Secondi, Contorni, and Digestivi.


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MELON WITH PROSCIUTTO


1/2 pound prosciutto, thinly sliced
1 medium-sized melon (cantaloupe or honey-dew)
Freshly ground black pepper

Peel melon and cut into small wedges, about 2 for each serving.  Wrap each wedge in prosciutto.  Serve with pepper. MELON WITH PROSCIUTTO

 

 

MOZZARELLA SKEWERS MOZZARELLA SKEWERS

Remove the crust from a loaf of Italian bread.  Cut loaf into slices about 1/3" inch thick.  Cut Mozzarella in the same size and thickness as the bread.  Place alternate slices of bread and cheese on a skewer until there are 3 layers of cheese, beginning and ending with bread.  Preheat baking dish and place skewers on it.  Bake in a pre-heated, very hot (450 to 475 degrees) oven, and bake just long enough for the cheese to melt and the bread to brown.  Melt 1/2 pound of butter.  Chop 8 anchovy fillets and simmer in the butter for 5 minutes.  Pour some of this anchovy butter over each skewer.  Serve as hot as you can.

 

MINESTRONE

MINESTRONE

1 pound 11oz. can red kidney bean
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. garlic salt
1 clove garlic, pressed
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 Tbs. olive oil
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 small zucchini, unpeeled and cut into small cubes
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 small carrot, diced
2 green onions, chopped
4-5 large leaves of Swiss Chard, chopped
3 Tbs. butter
1 8 oz. can tomato sauce
2-1/2 cups water
1/2 cup Chenin Blanc wine
1/4 uncooked elbow macaroni
grated parmesan cheese

Place undrained beans in a large kettle.  Mash about 2/3 of the beans and leave the rest whole.  Add salt, garlic salt, garlic, pepper, oil and parsley, stirring well.  Then add all the vegetables, butter, tomato sauce and water.  Simmer one hour or more and then add wine and macaroni.  Simmer 10-15 minutes longer.  Sprinkle each serving with grated parmesan cheese.   Serves 6.

 

PASTA WITH THREE CHEESES

noodle bows

Fine dry bread crumbs
12 oz. egg noodle bows (about 6 cups), cooked and hot
2 Tbs. butter
1 cup (4oz.) freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1 cup (4oz.) diced swiss cheese
1 cup (5oz.) diced mozzarella cheese
3 cups thin white sauce (described below)

Coat a buttered shallow 3 qt. baking dish with bread crumbs.  Toss noodles with butter, then Parmesan cheese.  Add Swiss and mozzarella cheeses; toss lightly.  Turn half the noodle mixture into prepared dish; top with half of the Thin White Sauce.  Repeat layers.  Sprinkle grated Parmesan or bread crumbs on top if desired.  Bake in pre-heated moderate oven, 350 degrees, 25 minutes.

Thin White Sauce

To prepare three cups:  Melt 3 Tbs. of butter in saucepan; blend in 3 Tbs. flour.  Gradually add 3 cups milk; cook, stirring constantly until sauce boils for 1 minute.  Add 1-1/2 tsp. salt, 1/4 tsp. pepper and 1/8 tsp. nutmeg.

 

NORTHERN ITALIAN CHICKEN CACCIATORE NORTHERN ITALIAN CHICKEN CACCIATORE

1/2 cup butter
1 cup minced onion
1/2 chopped parsley
1 chicken fryer-3lb., cut into pieces
1 cup water
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1/4 minced fresh basil
1 tsp. dried rosemary
1 bay leaf
salt and pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine

In large skillet, saute onion in hot butter for 5 minutes, or until soft.  Add parsley and cook 1 minute.  Add chicken pieces and cook until golden brown.  Add water, mushrooms, basil, rosemary, bay leaf, salt and pepper to taste.  Cover and simmer 15-20 minutes.  Add wine and cook another 15-20 minutes, or until chicken is tender.

 

PEPPERS, ROMAN STYLE PEPPERS, ROMAN STYLE

4 large peppers, (a mixture of green, red and yellow)
1 Tbs. lard
1 Tbs. olive oil
1 small onion, diced
3 large tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. basil

Place peppers on high heat directly on the burners, and roast until outer skin is black and blistered.  Using your fingers, peel off outer skin under running cold water.  Trim peppers free of membrane and seeds.  Cut into strips.  Dry thoroughly.  In heavy saucepan combine lard, oil and onion.  Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, for about 3 minutes or until onion is soft.  Add tomatoes and cook for 5 minutes.  Add peppers, salt, pepper and basil.  Simmer, covered, over low heat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until peppers are just tender.  Stir frequently.  If mixture is too thick, add a little hot water.

 

MIXED GREEN SALAD MIXED GREEN SALAD

1 head of romaine lettuce, heart only
1 head endive
1 head butter lettuce
5 radishes, sliced thin
2 stalks of celery heart, chopped
2 green onions, chopped
Grated Parmesan cheese, optional

Dressing:
1 Tbs. red wine vinegar
3 Tbs. olive oil
1/4 tsp. dry mustard
1 clove garlic, mashed
salt and pepper to taste

Serves 8-10.

 

ORANGE SHERRY CREAM ORANGE SHERRY CREAM ORANGE SHERRY CREAM

1/2 cup sugar
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tsp. grated orange rind
1/3 cup orange juice
3 eggs, separated
1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup dry sherry
1 cup whipping cream
1 (3 oz. package) lady fingers
1 (10 oz. package) frozen raspberries, thawed

Combine sugar, gelatin, salt and orange rind in top of double-boiler.  Stir in orange juice and lightly-beaten egg yolks.  Place over hot water; cook, stirring frequently, until mixture thickens, about 10-15 minutes.  Remove from heat; stir in lemon juice and sherry.  Cool until slightly thickened.  Beat egg whites until stiff; whip cream.  Fold egg white and cream into gelatin mixture.  Line an 8 or 9 inch spring form pan with lady fingers with tips cut off.  Carefully pour gelatin mixture into pan.  Chill until firm.  Cut into wedges and serve with thawed raspberries.

 

ESPRESSO COFFEE